Member of the Clube do Inferno zine label. I post my drawings and comics at spectacularmao.tumblr.com ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

blackholeattraction:

KATSUHIRO OTOMO

(via edicionesvalientes)

28 notes

andresmagan:

Combustión EspontáneaWatdafac Gallery

33 notes

lobbycards:

Zardoz, French lobby card. 1974

lobbycards:

Zardoz, French lobby card. 1974

(via popgunwar)

372 notes

littlemicrobiologyblog:

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament
via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

Kinesins are my favourite proteins! Walk it out kinesin! 

littlemicrobiologyblog:

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament

via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

Kinesins are my favourite proteins! Walk it out kinesin! 

(via nibiruisrising)

867 notes

berliac:

prscmx:

“Scapo!”, one-shot for
www.pariascomix.tumblr.com
Here’s the cover:
image

(via edicionesvalientes)

122 notes

altcomics:

Ida Applebroog

58 notes

kevinboehner:

Art Fuit Hic #1 interview with Erik Nebel

(via eriknebel)

133 notes

vicemag:

Meet the ‘Testo Junkie’ Who Hacks Her Gender with Testosterone 
In 2008, Beatriz Preciado published Testo Junkie, an unclassifiable essay that turned the academic world upside down and placed her as an international reference on what happens when you take testosterone outside a medical protocol or even outside a gender re-assignment protocol. She tests this thesis by using self-managed testosterone intake as a tool of “gender-hacking”—breaking into the gender codes that prescribe our social identities.
Testo Junkie was recently published in the US, which presented me with the perfect excuse to get in touch. Although Beatriz agreed to talk to me about her thesis, she’s not very fond of the press. As we head to a café she tell me that “VICE is the best of the worst.” I call her Beatriz and she corrects me: I should call her Beto. She smells like man and flowers—a gardenia in a suit.
VICE: Hi, Beto, thank you for agreeing to this interview. It’s an honour. Can you talk to me about your idea of using the body as an archive in Testo Junkie?Beatriz Preciado: Thinking that the body ends where the skin does is ridiculous, and yet that’s how we think. Instead of talking about the “body,” I use the term “body archive.” I see the body as a cultural and political archive, with images, narratives and practices stored in it. Our body is small but the wider somatic apparatus is gigantic.
What happens when testosterone comes into play?It is about your willingness to make your body a place of commitment. How you are perceived collectively, how you are built collectively—because, even if you independently decide to take testosterone, it’s never a completely individual act. There is a network involved; someone is going to smuggle it and you have to do it knowing that there will be side effects—that is, you will be viewed differently by society.
Obviously, when you take testosterone there are molecular changes taking place in your body, but above all there is a shift in your social position. So testosterone is to do with the management of your own body, but it goes way beyond that.
Continue

vicemag:

Meet the ‘Testo Junkie’ Who Hacks Her Gender with Testosterone 

In 2008, Beatriz Preciado published Testo Junkie, an unclassifiable essay that turned the academic world upside down and placed her as an international reference on what happens when you take testosterone outside a medical protocol or even outside a gender re-assignment protocol. She tests this thesis by using self-managed testosterone intake as a tool of “gender-hacking”—breaking into the gender codes that prescribe our social identities.

Testo Junkie was recently published in the US, which presented me with the perfect excuse to get in touch. Although Beatriz agreed to talk to me about her thesis, she’s not very fond of the press. As we head to a café she tell me that “VICE is the best of the worst.” I call her Beatriz and she corrects me: I should call her Beto. She smells like man and flowers—a gardenia in a suit.

VICE: Hi, Beto, thank you for agreeing to this interview. It’s an honour. Can you talk to me about your idea of using the body as an archive in Testo Junkie?
Beatriz Preciado: Thinking that the body ends where the skin does is ridiculous, and yet that’s how we think. Instead of talking about the “body,” I use the term “body archive.” I see the body as a cultural and political archive, with images, narratives and practices stored in it. Our body is small but the wider somatic apparatus is gigantic.

What happens when testosterone comes into play?
It is about your willingness to make your body a place of commitment. How you are perceived collectively, how you are built collectively—because, even if you independently decide to take testosterone, it’s never a completely individual act. There is a network involved; someone is going to smuggle it and you have to do it knowing that there will be side effects—that is, you will be viewed differently by society.

Obviously, when you take testosterone there are molecular changes taking place in your body, but above all there is a shift in your social position. So testosterone is to do with the management of your own body, but it goes way beyond that.

Continue

242 notes

mrkiki:

Rikki Kasso
Matsuri Mask 4, 2008sumi ink on wood panel90 x 90 cm
VIA
MORE

mrkiki:

Rikki Kasso

Matsuri Mask 4, 2008
sumi ink on wood panel
90 x 90 cm

VIA

MORE

(via milk-coconut)

82 notes

elbowhumble:

im moving(first time ever living anywhere but th’ ol’ hometown) to vermont next month to go to cartooning school but in two years when it’s over COOL BOOBS shall erupt from our hiatus to record a new album. our last album( http://coolboobs.bandcamp.com/) is kinda downerish (greasy shitty gods,unappreciated moms in peril, the total alone) in certain ways (DO NOT take this to mean i don’t love it with all my bulging heart), but looking optimistically toward two years from now, i predict (perhaps naively) a shift toward a sound that may possibly go so far as to incorporate joy, or at least the ability to find solace in this horrorshow. my head is always gonna be in darkness somewhat (it’s just how i’m built), but i’ve got this feeling (see “i’m set free” by the velvet underground) in me that’s kinda new and i think it’s only beginning.
also, let me ask your opinion, and please really do respond: should i add in some other words or would it make the composition too cluttered? the words would be:   1. the guy who is crying would say “thank goodness. i’m still blue from your last album” 2. the man-holding-the-head’s hat would say “Future School Bully” while the man to his right’s would read “Piss War General”. 3. by the dirty light surrounding our fans would  be the caption ” ‘We Can Wait!’ cry the fans, in love and sickly beauty” 4. at the end of the black cord, on the squiggly line would be “seeya soon, pretty babies” 5. of the conjoined duo at the bottom right, the one on the left who is still watching would be saying “hold on, hold on-sometimes they do something funny at the end” and the one smoking trying to exit would be saying “come on, ya mug- we got just enough time to take in the matinee”                            real talk, please tell me your opinions on those  possible changes cuz i’m really so unsure. does it stand well without em or would it add to it?  get at me and lemme know. 

elbowhumble:

im moving(first time ever living anywhere but th’ ol’ hometown) to vermont next month to go to cartooning school but in two years when it’s over COOL BOOBS shall erupt from our hiatus to record a new album. our last album( http://coolboobs.bandcamp.com/) is kinda downerish (greasy shitty gods,unappreciated moms in peril, the total alone) in certain ways (DO NOT take this to mean i don’t love it with all my bulging heart), but looking optimistically toward two years from now, i predict (perhaps naively) a shift toward a sound that may possibly go so far as to incorporate joy, or at least the ability to find solace in this horrorshow. my head is always gonna be in darkness somewhat (it’s just how i’m built), but i’ve got this feeling (see “i’m set free” by the velvet underground) in me that’s kinda new and i think it’s only beginning.

also, let me ask your opinion, and please really do respond: should i add in some other words or would it make the composition too cluttered? the words would be:   1. the guy who is crying would say “thank goodness. i’m still blue from your last album” 2. the man-holding-the-head’s hat would say “Future School Bully” while the man to his right’s would read “Piss War General”. 3. by the dirty light surrounding our fans would  be the caption ” ‘We Can Wait!’ cry the fans, in love and sickly beauty” 4. at the end of the black cord, on the squiggly line would be “seeya soon, pretty babies” 5. of the conjoined duo at the bottom right, the one on the left who is still watching would be saying “hold on, hold on-sometimes they do something funny at the end” and the one smoking trying to exit would be saying “come on, ya mug- we got just enough time to take in the matinee”                            real talk, please tell me your opinions on those  possible changes cuz i’m really so unsure. does it stand well without em or would it add to it?  get at me and lemme know. 

9 notes